Amazing engineering around the world - the Marina Bay Sands hotel, Singapore

tomorrowsengineers:

It looks like a giant, futuristic cricket wicket, but this casino and holiday resort is the world’s most expensive building, costing about £2.7 billion!

image

It hosts 2,500 rooms, theatres, restaurants, shops and a casino - the design for the building was apparently based on card decks.

The…

Amazing Engineering Around the World - The Grand Canyon Skywalk, Arizona, USA

tomorrowsengineers:

Woah! The Grand Canyon is spectacular as it is but engineers have created an incredible way of viewing this natural wonder.

image

The Grand Canyon Skywalk is a viewing platform suspended 4,000 feet above the Colorado River at the bottom of the canyon. It extends 21 metres out over the canyon…

Can’t wait to go here in October!

meehsofeeugh Asked:
Is it too late to try to be a civil engineer? I'm an average jane when it comes to math and science.

In theory, it’s never too late to re-train. Also, there are so many different roles within engineering, there is proably something for everyone.

In the UK, professional engineering requires a degree in engineering, most likely a master’s (MEng). With this you can then undertake training to become a Chartered Engineer (registered with the Institution of Civil Engineers or similar), allowing you to be responsible for projects.

If a degree in engineering would be too maths-heavy for you, then there are apprenticeships or other training courses which allow you to become an Engineering Technician. This requires either a vocational qualification, or apprenticeship/work experience at an engineering company.

The real difference is that you need a Master’s degree to be eligible to become Chartered Engineer, and for this you do need to have a strong maths background. To be an Engineering Technician this is not the case, however the roles at work will differ as it is more likely you will follow design specs rather than create your own.

For more info see the Engineering Coucil’s website here.

"You look around and there is an oil spill just about everyday, but we can’t put up a wind turbine because it might kill a bird or it might be ugly."

Robert Kulick, president of CRESIT Energy, on the challenges of creating a wind power revolution in Detroit.  (via thisbigcity)

(via thisbigcity)

mathmajik:

MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)
1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN. Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”
2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.  Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.
3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.  Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.
4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER. Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.
5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.  A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.
6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT. The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.
7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS. There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.
8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS. Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.
9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY. Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.
10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.
11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T. Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.
12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.  There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.
 Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.
Revised: Summer 1999  Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC) Southwest Texas State University
Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

mathmajik:

MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)

1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN.
Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”

2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.
Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.

3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.
Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.

4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER.
Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.

5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.
A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.

6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT.
The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.

7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS.
There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.

8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS.
Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.

9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY.
Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.

10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.

11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T.
Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.

12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.
There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.


Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.

Revised: Summer 1999 
Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC)
Southwest Texas State University

Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

(via girlengineer)

allofthemath:

The bounces correspond to wavelengths. This seems sufficiently mathematical to post. Also, it’s beautiful.

allofthemath:

The bounces correspond to wavelengths. This seems sufficiently mathematical to post. Also, it’s beautiful.

(via anengineersaspect)

shar-k:

ryanandmath:

How to read math. You’d be surprised how far this will get you.

EDIT: Some corrections

Need.

How to Attract Women into Engineering

Engineering needs a better profile - we need to get an accurate image of what engineering is out there. And that involves highlighting that it is in no way a ‘male-only’ profession. Women are just as competent and have the skills needed to succeed, we just need to make clear that women are welcome in the industry. The more young women see engineers of both sexes, the more it will become clear that it is a path open to them.

- H

breathtakingdestinations:

Petronas Towers - Kuala Lumpur - Malaysia (von Michael Foley Photography)

Kuala Lumpur has had enough tragedy already this year. The news of the MH17 disaster is too much to bear. 
This was not the fault of Malaysian Airlines.

breathtakingdestinations:

Petronas Towers - Kuala Lumpur - Malaysia (von Michael Foley Photography)

Kuala Lumpur has had enough tragedy already this year. The news of the MH17 disaster is too much to bear.

This was not the fault of Malaysian Airlines.

Does Engineering Have a Problem with Women?

In engineering in particular it is obvious that women and girls do not usually get the impression the industry is for them. It is important to address this issue, as there is a widening skills ‘gap’, with fewer engineers coming into the industry that we need to build a better future. If half the population are put off the industry from the outset, then we have a problem!

- H

Something is Putting Girls Off Engineering…

In engineering, the sheer numbers of men versus women are shocking: just 9% of engineers in the UK are female. Something is putting girls off engineering – I think it’s a culmination of the messages girls are receiving in childhood from media, films, and adverts. It is also because the stereotype of engineer does not represent what engineers actually do. Most of my job is in an office, behind a desk. I have only ever used a spanner to assemble ikea furniture (badly). In general, kids don’t get enough information on engineering, and the result of that is most do not even consider choosing it as a career (this is not gender specific). So if the stereotype is misrepresentative, plus the fact that engineering as an industry is barely visible to the public, then it’s not surprising that girls in particular are not attracted to the engineering profession. This is nothing to do with ability - girls consistently outperform their male classmates in school, even in maths and science which are seen as traditionally ‘male’.

- H